The Hours of Service regulations are there to keep drivers safe, but after conducting a study, we found that the 14-hour rule does not always serve that purpose. When drivers lose a couple of hours after being detained by shippers or receivers, the 14-hour limit propels them to drive in an unsafe manner.

Therefore, Motive is asking the FMCSA to change the 14-hour rule and extend it to 16 hours if drivers are detained for more than two hours.

What is the 14-hour rule?

As per the 14-hour rule, drivers are not allowed to drive beyond the 14th consecutive hour after coming on duty. 

However, according to a study we recently conducted, the 14-hour limitation sometimes does more harm than good.

What is the problem with the 14-hour rule?

The problem is that drivers often get detained by shippers or receivers.

We crunched some numbers and found that property-carrying drivers face, on average, seven detentions of two hours every month. Moreover, three in four drivers are detained at a pickup or drop-off location for over two hours every week.

As drivers already run on tight schedules, extended detentions make things difficult for them and leave them with only a few choices: miss the next delivery, speed, or break the Hours of Service regulations.

As you can see, none of these choices is safe.

Motive presents data to support the petition

We conducted a study to find out the exact impact extended detentions have on drivers.

What do most drivers do after they lose a couple of hours?

Based on our study, we found out that after extended detentions, drivers drive faster than they should. The following chart highlights the difference between how fast drivers drive before and after detentions.

We are creating a petition to ask the FMCSA to change the 14-hour rule and extend it to 16 hours if drivers are detained for more than two hours. It would prevent drivers from speeding and rushing to make deliveries.